Frequently Asked Questions

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS:

What are the development plans for the property?

Previous Plan (LEFT): Even though a large portion of the property (green) was set aside for conservation, the old conservation easement currently in place provides no corridor for animal movement, amongst a polka-dotted landscape speckled with houses (gray with black squares). Proposed Plan (RIGHT): Extinguish development rights on 148 lots (1025 acres) to protect the wildlife corridor (green) and create a buffer zone (brown hatch). The map shows the lots in the residential subdivision. The 24 now owned by Wildlife Corridors are shown with green building pads. Sixteen other lots (brown building pads) were sold prior to the acquisition of the property by Wildlife Corridors.

Previous Plan (LEFT): Even though a large portion of the property (green) was set aside for conservation, the old conservation easement currently in place provides no corridor for animal movement, amongst a polka-dotted landscape speckled with houses (gray with black squares).
Proposed Plan (RIGHT): Extinguish development rights on 148 lots (1025 acres) to protect the wildlife corridor (green) and create a buffer zone (brown hatch). The map shows the lots in the residential subdivision. The 24 now owned by Wildlife Corridors are shown with green building pads. Sixteen other lots (brown building pads) were sold prior to the acquisition of the property by Wildlife Corridors.

Is the residential area part of wildlife corridor?

The residential area was not part of land identified by the university study. This building area has already been substantially compromised as a corridor, based upon existing infrastructure. The Wildlife Corridor that will not be built upon was identified as an important wildlife linkage by the study.

Will there continue to be access to National Forest lands through the property? 

There is a road going through the property that has historically been used for access to Coronado National Forest. There is no official forest access road on the property. We would like to see no motorized vehicles in the main wildlife corridor, but motorized vehicles may be allowed in the 100-acre Recreational Buffer Zone area. Access to the National Forest is something we are considering and learning more about.

The Arizona Trail Association is interested in rerouting The Arizona Trail through the property, which would open up many more opportunities for bikers, hikers, and equestrians. Discussions are currently underway about these details.

Are there any plans to build wildlife underpasses on HWY 82?

Highway 82 has existing underpasses; there is also the opportunity with future road building in the area to provide more safe passages for wildlife and recreation. These areas are crucial as HWY 82 and HWY 2 in Sonora are the only two roads that bisect important wildlife corridors.

A round table discussion at the first WC public meeting. The results of this meeting was the creation of a Friends of Wildlife Corridors group.

A round table discussion at the first WC public meeting. The results of this meeting was the creation of a Friends of Wildlife Corridors group.

Will there continue to be opportunities for dog walking on and off leash? Will there continue to be places to ride horses? 

Grazing, recreation, and scientific studies will be permitted in the core Wildlife Corridor to the extent that they enhance habitat for wildlife and promote the coexistence of people and wildlife. These decisions will be made in conjunction with a burgeoning community advisory group, the Friends of Wildlife Corridors. We would love to see places for dogs to walk and run. WC is in favor of horse trails that are carefully monitored, maintained and are not disturbing plants and wildlife, but more research would need to be done or a proposal submitted before any decisions could be made.

Is there more information on the lots that will be available for purchase? 

Wildlife Corridors will sell up to an additional 24 residential lots on 220 acres in the southern portion of the property where paved roads, power, and water have already been installed. These lots will be a 4 acre minimum and up to 14-16 acres. The average lot size will be about 7 or 8 acres.

Contact us for more information regarding these lots.

Who is the development trying to attract?

WC hopes to interest local people by offering more affordable options. The price of lots will initially be a small portion of what 3 canyons was originally offering, but with some risks. People who want to support the project may purchase property without plans to build or to donate to WC, as a way to increase the impacts of open space and the wildlife corridor.

Will the existing CC&Rs (Covenants, Codes, and Restrictions) remain or be changed? 

Our current approach is that existing CC&Rs need to be modified. The current CC&Rs have positive elements, such as the conservation easement, but overall, we feel they are too restrictive. We would like to see the minimum house sized reduced, and have more flexibility in both architectural styles and building pad placement.

Does WC own the Conservation Easement?

The Sonoran Institute owns the Conservation Easement. WC is speaking with SI about the ownership of the easement.

How will encroachment on wildlife corridor be prevented? 

We can create accurate maps for people. This is something that will have to be decided by the Home Owner’s Association in conjunction with property managers.

Will commercial development be permitted on available lots? 

Current CC&Rs exclude any business opportunities. We are seeking to change the restrictions so that a small scale native plant nursery can be located in the Buffer Zone between the residential area and the corridor.

Has there been communication with current owners of residential lots? 

We have spoken with the majority of owners of the lots, but have not been able to contact all owners. No one currently lives at any of these owned lots.

Will there be some sort of interpretive center/information center?

WC wants to demonstrate what is possible in conservation work. This will be a place where people can come to work together. There is a lot of potential for hands-on projects, learning about how to restore, and possibly a field school and artist in residency programs. The Borderlands Earth Care Youth Institute will be some of the first participants in this type of education on the property.

What are some of the priority projects?

Removal of the Johnson Grass along the roadsides to enable safe traveling, and mitigation of other invasive species. We are looking for interested people to join in on this and other projects as part of the Friends of Wildlife Corridors group.

What is the vision for the future?

We see this project as one of many projects happening within  the next 30 years. Our approach is to take conservation to a scale that is beyond what it is at now. The only way to do this, as we see it, is to make conservation economically feasible. This is a testing grounds, an opportunity for whoever wants to be involved to work it out on this stage/place.

You are cordially invited to participate in this exciting project, just like these 60 community members who attended the first public meeting.

You are cordially invited to participate in this exciting project, just like these 60 community members who attended the first public meeting.

For More Information:

Look for Public Meetings on the events page. Also, events posted on the Borderlands Restoration Facebook page.

We seek your input, suggestions, concerns, and creative ideas about how we might all thrive in the shared activities of caring for land and cultivating relationships to it, and to one another. WC is looking for partners, people interested in helping to take care of land and its management, who have a deep interest in becoming part of the project.

 

Some of the species & work that could be done on the property. Photo Credits: Sky Island Alliance & Steve Buckley

Some of the species & work that could be done on the property. Photo Credits: Sky Island Alliance & Steve Buckley

 

  • Our Mission

    The mission of Borderlands Restoration is to reconnect wildlife, land, and people in the Arizona/Sonora Borderland region by involving people in restoring the ecosystem on which we depend.

  • Contact

    PO Box 1191
    299 McKeown Ave, Suite #3
    Patagonia, AZ 85624

    (520) 216-4148